Barcelona, a photo a day

ships

Post 1701: beauty in the old shipyard

A bit of HDR today, as it brings this structure so well to the light.
This is the ancient shipyard, where they used to build galleons and other wooden marvels. It is now, centuries later, the marvelous maritime museum, aka MMB.


Figuring out the figurehead…

One of the tall ships present in Barcelona during last summer’s Merce festival, had this figurehead. And I just can’t figure it out. Can you?


Laia

The Santa Eulalia, part of the Maritime Museum, and named after the patron saint of Barcelona. Everybody calls them, the saint and the ship, Laia.


Port Vell

Had a nice walk in the old port last night, and the best crepe I’ve ever had this side of the Pyrenees mountains, smoked salmon and cream cheese.
Wanted to take the ferry to Ibiza, but… Maybe another time.


Ritter Johann von Österreich’s Real

Ritter Johann von Österreich, aka Don Juan de Austria, in English John of Austria, an illegitimate son of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, had this gem built here, in the Barcelona Drassanes shipyards. With its 60 meters lenght, the Real was the largest galley of its time, and Don Juan’s flagship in the battle of Lepanto, in 1571, when a fleet of the Holy League, an alliance of Christian powers of the Mediterranean, decisively defeated an Ottoman fleet under Grand Admiral  Müezzinzade Ali Pasha.
In 1971, to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the battle, a replica of La Real was built and displayed in the Museu Marítim in Barcelona where it can be viewed today. The ship was 60 m long and 6.2 m wide, had two masts, and weighed 237 tons empty. It was equipped with three heavy and six light artillery pieces, was propelled by a total of 290 rowers and, in addition, carried some 400 sailors and soldiers at Lepanto. 50 men were posted on the upper deck of the forecastle, 50 on the midships ramp, another 50 each along the sides at the bow, 50 each on the skiff and oven platforms, 50 on the firing steps along the sides near the stern, and 50 more on the stern platform behind the huge battle flag. To help move and maneuvre the huge ship, it was pushed from the rear during the battle by two other galleys.
Befitting a royal flagship, it was luxuriously ornamented and painted in the red and gold colors of Spain. Its poop was elaborately carved and painted with numerous sculptures, bas-reliefs, paintings and other embellishments, most of them evoking religious and humanistic inspirational themes.


Boy toy?

Probably.

Kim’s Water World Wednesday meme is here.


It’s Friday!

And it’s Skywatch Friday!


Skywatching…

… on Friday


She’s big!!!

The Liberty of the Seas, the largest passenger ship ever built! That thing is so huge that I could not get her on one photo, even though I was several hundred meters away, with a 24mm lens. You’ll find some more information about her here.
Just one thing… You want one? You’ll need to fork out 800 million dollars, 550 million euros. Crisis, what crisis???

Anyway, big and beautiful, but not our cup of tea, as we prefer something much smaller.


The painter

Remaining on this week’s maritime theme (wasn’t planned, just came out like this), here is the Horizon, out of Valetta, Malta. Needs a wee bit of painting, it seems. I wonder if the people underneath the painter are aware of his presence? One more of these ‘ invisible’ workers who make our life what it is.


Hanging out

Nothing really to add. Except that it is for the weekly WATER WORLD WEDNESDAY , and also the NF Waters meme.


Pretty granny!

She is 94 years old, and she is so pretty! The schooner Santa Eulalia, proud property of the Maritime Museum in Barcelona. She is usually moored nearby, this is the first time I’ve actually seen her sailing.


Going with the wind

Oh yes! Wish we had the time!


100 years later….

 
Over 200 artifacts from the Titanic, some of them actually rescued from the wreck, to be seen at the Maritime Museum until the end of September. You can also see how the Titanic has been built, how life was on board, the passenger list, and much more. After Singapore, Melbourne, etc, now in Barcelona!


An interesting visitor

The MS Hamburg, on her maiden voyage. Well, not quite, really… Formerly known as the MS Columbus, it was built 15 years ago, but has just changed owner. Right now, it is coming from Nice in France and is on it’s way to Malaga, Lisbon and Hamburg, where it will be officially christened ‘MS Hamburg’ on June 7th. It is a small ship,  which allows it to go to smaller places than her giant cousin in the back of the photo the Norwegian Epic. I’d rather go with the smaller one…Or even better, steering my own sailing boat.
 On the menu today? Hamburgers, I suppose.


Watery Wednesday…

…in Sitges, 30 km south of Barcelona, and not the Caribbean.
I know, it’s been my latest header photo for the last couple of days, but I couldn’t resist posting it for Watery Wednesday!


Nao Victoria, a welcome visitor!

Victoria (or Nao Victoria, as well as Vittoria) was a Spanish carrack and the first ship to successfully circumnavigate the world. The Victoria was part of a Spanish expedition commanded by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, and after his demise during the voyage, by Juan Sebastián Elcano. The expedition began with five ships but the Victoria was the only ship to complete the voyage. Magellan was killed in the Philippines. This ship, along with the four others, was given to Magellan by King Charles I of Spain. Victoria was named after the church of Santa Maria de la Victoria de Triana, where Magellan took an oath of allegiance to Charles V in order to be granted full access to the Spice Islands. Victoria was an 85 tons ship with a crew of 42.
The four other ships were Trinidad (110 tons, crew 55), San Antonio (120 tons, crew 60), Concepcion (90 tons, crew 45), and Santiago (75 tons, crew 32). Trinidad, Magellan’s flagship, Concepcion, and Santiago were wrecked or scuttled; San Antonio deserted the expedition before the Straits of Magellan and returned to Europe on her own.
Victoria was rated a carrack or nao (ship), as were all the others except Trinidad, which was a caravel.
Click here to read more about this beautiful Nao.

And this is a replica, built in Punta Arenas, Chile, between 2006 and 2009.


Sad Watery Wednesday

An Italian ferry, anchored at Montjuic Hill.
This is dedicated to the victims of the Costa Concordia.
Watery Wednesday.


Leaving…

Bon voyage!

Many more watery pictures here.


Carpe Diem

We came across them a few weeks ago. Happy people. And here is their website. See for yourselves.


Watery Wednesday 158

We got this extremely nice panorama-making program the other day. Here is one we did last sunday. 11 photos stitched together… Very happy about the result!!!

Watery Wednesday, have a look!


Watery Wednesday

One of the great things to do here…

This is for the weekly Watery Wednesday meme. Click here!


Watery Wednesday

Leaving Barcelona…. for about 90 minutes.

This is for  the Watery Wednesday meme. Click here to see more fabulous watery photos!


Lolita y Encarnacion…

… are 2 of the Golondrinas (swallows) taking tourists around the port and along the coast. It is a very nice thing to do when you’re visiting Barcelona… and the sea is not too choppy!


Late cruise

We went on a  little cruise last night, and the light was amazing…


Golden

One early morning in the ferry-port…

National holiday here in Catalunya today, la Diada. Don’t you hate it when holidays fall on a weekend???!!!!


The cruise ships

Bringing up to 70.000 tourists a day to Barcelona…