Barcelona, a photo a day

museum

La Salchichona

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Aka woman in mantilla. Picasso painted this in 1917, aged 36. A wonderful painting. A smooth face, surrounded by points (pointillist technique).


A detail

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A detail in Salvador Dali’s museum-house-theatre in Figueres, 120 km north of Baecelona


Big girl

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Saw this girlie one day at the MACBA. It was an open day for kids at the modern art museum. Cool! The kids loved her!


MNAC

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This is the rather magnificent cupola at the MNAC, the national catalan art museum, on Montjuic hill. An absolute must see! The view upon Barcelona from up there is gorgeous as well!


The pond at the MMB

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There is this lovely pond at the Museu Maritim de Barcelona, complete with statue, goldfishes and 2 turtles. A little haven, a perfect place to have a cafe solo and to watch tourist go by.


Red…

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… is my favorite bench in town, the one in the Caixaforum museum!


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Magic!

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It’s magic, and it’s every weekend in Montjuic, in front of the National Art Museum of Catalunya, the MNAC


One for the ladies?

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The perfume museum. Hmm, only for the ladies? I don’t think so!


Post 1701: beauty in the old shipyard

A bit of HDR today, as it brings this structure so well to the light.
This is the ancient shipyard, where they used to build galleons and other wooden marvels. It is now, centuries later, the marvelous maritime museum, aka MMB.


Now that’s how to make an entrance! Aka post 1648

This is the extraordinary entrance to the Cosmocaixa science museum. You actually have to spiral down, around a 30m/90 ft tall brazilian rain forest tree.
Elevators to go out…

And by the way, I almost forgot about it, but this blog celebrated it’s 5th blogaversy on may 10th. Hooray!!!!


Laia

The Santa Eulalia, part of the Maritime Museum, and named after the patron saint of Barcelona. Everybody calls them, the saint and the ship, Laia.


MEAM Barcelona

A few meters away from the Picasso Museum, there is this, the European Museum of Modern Art. Not been inside yet (well, we have about 99 or 100 museums in town, and this one is quite new…), but we will soon, as it specializes in modern figurative art (photography…). Here is the intriguing and inviting entrance.
Many museums in the same area, the mammoth museum, a motorbike museum, a museum of pre-colombian art, the museum of bizarre things…..


50 years!

The Picasso Museum is celebrating it’s 50th anniversary, so we went there on Saturday. Photos forbidden, but… Here is one of the beautiful ceilings. And also one of the paintings.


A weekend reflection…

…at the Maritime Museum. Click here to see more.


Water World Wednesday

The fountain with pond in the courtyard of the Maritime Museum, for Water World Wednesday.


Ritter Johann von Österreich’s Real

Ritter Johann von Österreich, aka Don Juan de Austria, in English John of Austria, an illegitimate son of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, had this gem built here, in the Barcelona Drassanes shipyards. With its 60 meters lenght, the Real was the largest galley of its time, and Don Juan’s flagship in the battle of Lepanto, in 1571, when a fleet of the Holy League, an alliance of Christian powers of the Mediterranean, decisively defeated an Ottoman fleet under Grand Admiral  Müezzinzade Ali Pasha.
In 1971, to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the battle, a replica of La Real was built and displayed in the Museu Marítim in Barcelona where it can be viewed today. The ship was 60 m long and 6.2 m wide, had two masts, and weighed 237 tons empty. It was equipped with three heavy and six light artillery pieces, was propelled by a total of 290 rowers and, in addition, carried some 400 sailors and soldiers at Lepanto. 50 men were posted on the upper deck of the forecastle, 50 on the midships ramp, another 50 each along the sides at the bow, 50 each on the skiff and oven platforms, 50 on the firing steps along the sides near the stern, and 50 more on the stern platform behind the huge battle flag. To help move and maneuvre the huge ship, it was pushed from the rear during the battle by two other galleys.
Befitting a royal flagship, it was luxuriously ornamented and painted in the red and gold colors of Spain. Its poop was elaborately carved and painted with numerous sculptures, bas-reliefs, paintings and other embellishments, most of them evoking religious and humanistic inspirational themes.


Elton John’s old bathtub

Well… Last Friday after work, we went out for dinner, to a place called the Happy Rock Grill. Had a nice dinner, paid, and then I went to the bathroom before leaving. Well, on the way back, I noticed this massive golden thing in the back of the restaurant. Strange, I said to myself, it looks like a golden bathtub, under a glass plate, with chairs around it.
Had a closer look, and the tag at the corner said, in English, Spanish and Catalan: Elton John’s personal bathtub, 1994.

It seems to be what’s left of the Museum of Rock, which used to be next door, and is closed now.

Not quite sure who had this strange idea, putting someone’s old bathtub in a restaurant, basically in a dining room. But I don’t think we will go back there. And it definitely is one of the weirdest things I ever saw in a restaurant. What about you, what is the weirdest thing you saw in a restaurant or foodie place?


Smelly vials!

Among the 100 or so museums in Barcelona, there is also a perfume museum, which Mandy visited some time ago. Situated in the back of a … perfume shop on Passeig de Gracia, it must smell quite heavenly.
Photo courtesy of Mandy, of course.


The body electric

Back to the Cosmocaixa, Barcelona’s museum of science. I have no idea what this is called, but kids (and I) just love it!


Pretty granny!

She is 94 years old, and she is so pretty! The schooner Santa Eulalia, proud property of the Maritime Museum in Barcelona. She is usually moored nearby, this is the first time I’ve actually seen her sailing.


Poble Espanyol

One of the exits of the small museum in the Poble Espanyol museum village. A museum inside of a museum, if you want… Photos forbidden, as usual. As they were some guards around, I meekly followed the (silly) law. Me, a law-abiding citizen, yes Sir!
You want to see more? Just click on Poble Espanyol just below.

And don’t forget: it’s monthly Theme Day soon! Here‘s the link (not open yet). The theme is: people watching. On your cameras, go! See you all on September 1st!


100 years later….

 
Over 200 artifacts from the Titanic, some of them actually rescued from the wreck, to be seen at the Maritime Museum until the end of September. You can also see how the Titanic has been built, how life was on board, the passenger list, and much more. After Singapore, Melbourne, etc, now in Barcelona!


Tranquility…

…is today’s theme.

Click here to view thumbnails for all participants


Books, dragons and roses: la diada de Sant Jordi


La Diada de Sant Jordi (Catalan pronunciation: [ɫə ðiˈaðə ðə ˈsaɲ ˈʒɔrði], Saint George’s Day), also known as El dia de la Rosa (The Day of the Rose) or El dia del Llibre (The Day of the Book) is a Catalan holiday held on 23 April, with similarities to Valentine’s Day and some unique twists that reflect the antiquity of the celebrations. The main event is the exchange of gifts between sweethearts, loved ones and colleagues. Historically, men gave women roses, and women gave men a book to celebrate the occasion—”a rose for love and a book forever.” In modern times, the mutual exchange of books is also customary. Roses have been associated with this day since medieval times, but the giving of books is a more recent tradition originating in 1923, when a bookseller started to promote the holiday as a way to commemorate the nearly simultaneous deaths of Miguel Cervantes and William Shakespeare on 23 April 1616. Barcelona is the publishing capital of both Catalan and Spanish languages and the combination of love and literacy was quickly adopted.
In Barcelona’s most visited street, La Rambla, and all over Catalonia, thousands of stands of roses and makeshift bookstalls are hastily set up for the occasion. By the end of the day, some four million roses and 800,000 books will have been purchased. Most women will carry a rose in hand, and half of the total yearly book sales in Catalonia take place on this occasion.
The sardana, the national dance of Catalonia, is performed throughout the day in the Plaça Sant Jaume in Barcelona. Many book stores and cafes host readings by authors (including 24-hour marathon readings of Cervantes’ “Don Quixote”). Street performers and musicians in public squares add to the day’s atmosphere.
23 April is also the only day of the year when the Palau de la Generalitat, Barcelona’s principal government building, is open to the public. The interior is decorated with roses to honour Saint George.
Catalonia exported its tradition of the book and the rose to the rest of the world. In 1995, the UNESCO adopted 23 April as World Book and Copyright Day.

 And yes, Mandy had her magnificent rose, and I got a sumptuous (cook)book.

Our World on Tuesday