Barcelona, a photo a day

markets

Sabado

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Saturday. Just another day at the Boqueria market. Getting set up for the day.


World food, with overgin

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Empanadas! Anywhere, anytime! An empanada (Spanish pronunciation: [empaˈnaða]; also called pastel in Brazilian Portuguese) is a stuffed bread or pastry baked or fried in many countries in Latin Europe, Latin America, the Southwestern United States, and parts of Southeast Asia. The name comes from the Galician, Portuguese, and Spanish verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread.
In Spain, empanadas and empanadillas are two different types of cooking a similar thing. Empanadillas are often made from a rather thin, pliant, but resilient wheat pastry, cut into a round shape, stuffed and folded. The filling varies, but tuna, sardines, or meat are used most commonly in a tomato puree, garlic and onion sauce. Spanish empanadillas are often fried in olive oil but can also be found baked.

In Galicia, the empanada can also be prepared similar to a pie, with a variety of fillings like cod, pork loin, cockles, mussels, or octopus, the empanada galega. Empanadas can be eaten at any time of the day. As I mentioned before.

They are everywhere! More about them here.

No comment about overgin (open up the photo to know what the heck I’m talking about). Someone’s sense of humor at the Boqueria market, I hope…


Man loves dogs

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At the Boqueria, Europe’s coolest market.

More B&W for this weekend right here.


Everywhere you go, always take…

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… your hula hoops with you. Specially should you be in a crowded house, place…


El mercat antic del Born

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The old covered market in the Born, now a culture center, complete with 2000 years old roman street. A must see!


Decisions, decisions…

I’m always having a hard time at the mercat de Sant Josep… Balancing the urge of buying a lot of this gorgeous high quality food… with my economic reality. I never managed, always spending too much.

Oh, you might know this market as Boqueria. For us locals, it is St Joseph’s market. And to photographers, it is known as ‘paradise’. There has been a market here since 1217, 797 years ago.

And, no, this is not HDR, just Lightroom and Nik filters.


The old Sant Antoni market

Better known around here as the mercat de Sant Antoni, X shaped, it was built between 1879 and 1882. It is closed now, the city replaced it by a 2 temporary plastic hangars nearby. The old market is supposed to be undergoing restoration, although I haven’t seen anyone working in those grandiose ruins in the last 4 or 5 years. Temporary things tend to last long here.


Not only in Venice…

… but in Barcelona as well, we do have some glassblowers. And glass shapers.

Yes, it is theme day again, and the theme is the creative artisan. Click here to see more entries to the theme.


Have a coffee!

While doing your shopping at the Boqueria market, it is essential to have a coffee! Either a cafe solo, otherwise known as expresso, a cortado, which is a solo with a little milk, or a cafe con leche, big coffee with lots of hot or cold milk. As you like it.


Market day…

…at the Mercat Sant Josep de la Boqueria


Smiles

Happy smiling faces at the Boqueria market! And the veggies look absolutely gorgeous!

Our world Tuesday, right here.


Market day…

…is from Monday to Saturday, in any of the numerous markets in town. The quality is so much better than in any supermarket or mall!


Nuts!

Found that great nut place! With a very willing vendor! This guy could sell refrigerators to Eskimos!
But no, I didn’t buy anything, will come back later, no need for nuts right now.


Bon Nadal!

Joyeux Noel, Merry Christmas, frohe Weihnachten, buon Natale,Meri Kirihimete ki a koe me te whanau
feliz Navidad, E güeti Wïnâchte,
Beannachtaí na Nollag, Maligayang pasko at manigong bagong taon, feliz Natal, god Jul, and

E schéine Chrëschtdag to all our friends and relatives all around this beautiful blue planet!

OK, that’s Catalan, French, English, German, Italian, Maori, Spanish, Alsatian, Gaelic, Tagalog, Portuguese, Swedish and Luxemburgish.


Time…

It is the time of the year when everything turns christmassy, bright and joyful. Yeah, let’s forget the darn crisis for a while!


Jumping cow

Ain’t she pretty!


Bewitched?

Do you have Christmas witches in your respective cultures?


The Christmas market is on…

… and my humans took me with them!


Caganers!!!

It’s that time of the year again, it’s Caganer time! Above, some players from the Barcelona Football Club, the Barca.

A Caganer is a figurine depicted in the act of defecation appearing in nativity scenes in Catalonia and neighbouring areas with Catalan culture such as Andorra, Valencia, Northern Catalonia (in southern France) and the Balearic Islands.
In Catalonia, as well as in the rest of Spain and in most of Italy and Southern France, traditional Christmas decorations sometimes consist of a large model of the city of Bethlehem, similar to the Nativity scenes of the English-speaking world but encompassing the entire city rather than just the typical manger scene. In Catalonia, the pessebre or nativity scene is often a reproduction of a pastoral scene with a traditional Catalan masia (farmhouse) as a central setting with the child in a manger, with outlying scenes of a washerwoman by a river, a woman spinning, shepherds walking towards the manger area laden with gifts and herding their sheep, the three wise men approaching on horseback, an annunciation scene with the angel and shepherds, the star pointing the way, etc., all of this usually set on moss to represent grass, with cork used to represent mountains or cliffs. Another variant is to make the setting oriental, with the wise men arriving by camel and the figures dressed accordingly.
The caganer is a particular and highly popular feature of modern Catalan nativity scenes. It is believed to have entered the nativity scene by the late 17th-early 18th century, during the Baroque period. Eminent folklorist Joan Amades called it an essential piece and the most popular figure of the nativity scene. It can also be found in other parts of southwestern Europe, including Murcia, the region just south of the Valencia in Spain (where they are called cagones), Naples (cacone or pastore che caca) and Portugal (cagões). There is a sculpture of a person defecating hidden inside the cathedral of Ciudad Rodrigo, Province of Salamanca, though this is not part of a nativity scene. Accompanying Mary, Joseph, Jesus, the shepherds and company, the caganer is often tucked away in a corner of the model, typically nowhere near the manger scene. A tradition in the Catalan Countries is to have children find the hidden figure.
Possible reasons for placing a figure representing a person in the act of excreting waste in a scene which is widely considered holy include:

  • Tradition.
  • Perceived humour.
  • A fun spectacle, especially for children.
  • The Caganer, by creating feces, is fertilizing the Earth. According to the ethnographer, Joan Amades, it was a “customary figure in pessebres [i.e. nativity scenes] in the 19th century, because people believed that this deposit [symbolically] fertilized the ground of the pessebre, which became fertile and ensured the pessebre for the following year, and with it, the health of body and peace of mind required to make the pessebre, with the joy and happiness brought by Christmas near the hearth. Placing this figurine in the pessebre brought good luck and joy and not doing so brought adversity.”
  • The Caganer represents the equality of all people: regardless of status, race, or gender, everyone defecates.
  • Increased naturalism of an otherwise archetypal (thus idealised) story, so that it is more believable, more real and can be taken more seriously.
  • The idea that God will manifest himself when he is ready, without regard for whether we human beings are ready or not.
  • The Caganer reinforces the belief that the infant Jesus is God in human form, with all that being human implies.
  • The character introduces a healthy amount of religious doubt to test one’s faith.
  • A humorous allusion to the Spanish proverb (in translation), “Dung is no saint, but where it falls it works miracles.”

Further opinions:

  • “The caganer was the most mischievous and out-of-place character of the pessebre’s [otherwise] idyllic landscape; he was the “Other”, with everything that entails, and as the “Other”, was accepted, in a liberal vein, as long as he did not aim to occupy the foreground. The caganer represented the spoilsport that we all have inside of us, and that’s why it is not surprising that it was the most beloved figure among the children and, above all, the adolescents, who were already beginning to feel a bit like outsiders to the family celebration.” Agustí Pons
  • “The caganer is a hidden figure and yet is always sought out like the lost link between transcendence and contingency. Without the caganer, there would be no nativity scene but rather a liturgy, and there would be no real country but just the false landscape of a model.” Joan Barril
  • “The caganer seems to provide a counterpoint to so much ornamental hullabaloo, so much emotive treacle, so much contrived beauty.” Josep Murgades
  • “The caganer is, like so many other things that have undergone the filtering of a great many generations, a cult object; with the playful, aesthetic and superficial devotion that we feel towards all the silly things that fascinate us deep down.” Jordi Soler

 Anyway, here are some people, Kate Middleton, her hubby Will, Prince Charles and his mum, doing their bit for England…

Some others, doing their bit for Gaul…

and for whichever planet they are from…


Harsh times…

Crisis? Hard times? No reason not to look good!


AD 1570

441 years of Christmas market in Strasbourg… A few glimpses, a few impressions.


Market scene, aka post 900

This is a mediterranean photo. Although the photo was taken in Barcelona, the food depicted can be found all around the Med, Turkey, Italy, Israel, Algeria, and further away. I read years ago in the National Geographic that people living on a mediterranean diet (they mentioned olive oil, lots of garlic and some red wine) live longer. It is probably true, and what is even better: the food is delicious!

900 posts! Who would have thought…


Pintxu d’embotit catala

This weekend, we’re having here the mercat dels mercats, the market’s market, the best of all markets around. I love what they did to these sausages!
Private message to the All Blacks: very well done, mates!!!


Just another museum.

Fed up walking around in the sun, too hot for the beach? Here is an idea: the Museum of Erotica, in front of the Boqueria market. You get a free drink,and Wifi, how’s that?